Tuesday, May 16, 2017

What do you see in the cup?




I am participating in the
Tuesday Slice of Life.
All participants are writing about one moment, one part of their day.
A big thank you to Two Writing Teachers for providing this unique opportunity
for teacher-writers to share and reflect.

Observational drawing by Jada

It's spring and we have a cup of caterpillars in our preschool classroom! Just this past weekend, they formed chrysalises and the preschoolers are in awe. I've tried to slow down the thinking, having the preschoolers make observational drawings of what they see. (I will share a few of these here, in this blogpost.) I knew this was the perfect lesson for the "See Think Wonder" thinking routine, which I had learned from Project Zero training last summer. As they drew, I asked What do you see? I tried to keep the children focused on simply what was visible in the jar:

I see four chrysalises. I call 'em caterpillars. And the jar. And spider webs.
I see cobwebs, 'cause they make cobwebs, and cocoons.
I see cocoons.
I see this one and it has a black part.
I see cocoons playing.
Observational drawing by Misha
There is dirt on the bottom.
I see the bodies on the circle.
The caterpillars made cocoons and they are hanging up.
I see caterpillars walking and eating food. 
Caterpillars make cocoons.
Four cocoons.
Caterpillars have pointy things.
Cocoons hang from the sky. They are shaking.
I see a spiderweb.
Cocoons. They are shaking. Caterpillars make it.
I see cocoons.

Try as I liked to have them simply focus on what they saw - what they actually observed - the preschoolers couldn't help thinking and imagining. They shared thoughts aloud that were clearly not visible. I tried to return them to observation mode with a quick, What did you see that makes you think so? However, their musings multiplied and I let them answer - What do you think?

I think there was an egg.
I think caterpillars walk around and they sleep.
The cocoon is for the caterpillar
That might be food. They eat leaves.
Observational drawing by Audrey
Something's in it - maybe a butterfly.
They come from eggs, they turn into caterpillars, and then they turn into butterflies.
And push out into a butterfly!
It looks like fish; it is the same color. It looks like a Daddy Long Legs with its leg stuck in the web.
The caterpillars will turn into butterflies and then will fly.

I never even had to ask, What do you wonder? The preschoolers were mesmerized by the disappearance of crawling caterpillars and the arrival of four chrysalises hanging from the top of the jar. Their questions poured forth - 

Observational drawing by Henry
What are the webs for?
Are the caterpillars shaking the cocoons inside?
What let's it hang?
What is the gakky [sic] thing on the bottom?
Did the cocoon on the bottom die?
What do caterpillars eat? I wonder if they eat dirt?
Is it a spider web.
Are there new baby eggs in the jar?
What are the black fuzzy things on the bottom? Is it part of a caterpillar?
Why shouldn't we touch it?
Is the cocoon on the bottom eating the food?
Would the caterpillars be scared?

Observational drawing by Gabrielle
The most frequent wonder revolved around the movement of the chrysalises - these definitely appeared to be shaking, wiggling, moving. I loved this exchange between four students -
What is making them shake?
- Because they are shaking a lot of days.
- Caterpillars are playing in their house.
- Because they are trying to spread out their wings.

It is amazing how much language and thinking comes forth when preschoolers can watch this metamorphosis right up close!




3 comments:

  1. Such a cool experience for kids. I like how you make their thinking visible.

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  2. LOVE the S/T/W routine and all things Project Zero! Such a wonderful routine to use with your preschoolers. Love the thought of "caterpillars are playing in their house." Christie @ https://wonderingandwondering.wordpress.com/blog/

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